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Video of the unique and weird design HondaJet with its top of the wing mounted engines. It first flew in 2003 and was certified in 2015. I was surprise to see such a high nose up attitude at landing.

Video of the unique and weird design HondaJet with its top of the wing mounted engines. It first flew in 2003 and was certified in 2015. I was surprise to see such a high nose up attitude at landing.

shorty_0123

Vtec just kicked in yo


Hissingfever_

Any advantage to wing mounted engines like that instead of them being mounted on the fuselage?


Sir_Sockless

Its so there's no need for re-enforcing structure to mount the engines on the fuselage, so the cabin can be bigger. They're mounted that high up so that the engine doesn't interfere with the wings aerofoil. Pretty much this designs been done before (fokker 614), but it didn't work too well because the engine messed with the wings. But now we have better materials and computational analysis, this design can actually work.


TailRudder

Also cabin noise


foxxray54

The engines are a little further from the cabin so it is quieter inside and maximizes cabin space by removing the structure required to mount engines on the rear of the fuselage.


GenTycho

Maybe to make more room in the rear of the fuselage? Wont have lines running through the fuselage since its sitting over the wing tanks. But dont know if they use a fuselage tank or not. Pure conjecture btw. In no way am I an engineer


IQueryVisiC

In this video the strut holding the engine seems to be very thick and bend outwards. They really look like anti-shock bodies. Still this would mean that airflow is supersonic all the way to the trailing edge? I'd rather have a steeper sweep angle and a clean wing.


GunzAndCamo

Approach and departure angles looked perfectly normal to me. There are three things I can think of that that unorthodox engine mounting gets you: 1. It allows the undercarriage to be much shorter, saving mass and mechanical complexity in the landing gear and boarding ramp. 2. Since the engines are not directly coupled to the fuselage, you might be able to see a modicum of noise isolation, making the cabin interior quieter. 3. Since the engines and wings are directly connected, no need to route any fuel lines through the fuselage proper, as you would with a Cessna Citation-type arrangement. This may simplify fuel management systems.


alphageist

The high nose up at landing is because: 1) the center of mass has shifted backwards due to the weight and placement of the engines 2) the thrust vector of the engines are above the longitudinal axis of the aircraft, which naturally pushes the nose down during a “normal” landing As such, this aircraft will require a faster speed and a high angle of attack (high nose up) during landing. The aircraft came in hot for landing, did it not? For reference, check out the “Man Eater” or the “Supersonic Booze Carrier”, the Tupulev TU-22. https://youtu.be/bKoHMXggEHU


Danarwal14

When it landed... The snoot drooped


LilBone3

"high nose up attitude" - sounds like a real snob to me


TheKingofJinga

A flying sculpture, a true work of modern art.


Ickis-The-Bunny

Gorgeous planes and relatively easy to work on!


andynorm

The wings structure is already re enforced at that point near the wing root for the landing gear so might as well mount the engine to that point.


loihsdtmh

Flightradar link for those interested in where it flies. [aircraft/f-hene](https://www.flightradar24.com/data/aircraft/f-hene)